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Culture

Experience Life On Mars At The HMNS’s Otherworldly Exhibit

Colby Smith Colby Smith

Experience Life On Mars At The HMNS’s Otherworldly Exhibit

Celebrate NASA’s Perseverance Rover landing on Mars by getting better acquainted with the red planet.

The Houston Museum of Natural Science gave us the world, and now they’re giving us Mars. Channel your inner Ziggy Stardust and see if there really is Life on Mars at the HMNS’s Mars from Luke Jerram. [Featured image: @museum_mike_]

Other than maybe NASA, no institution takes their home in Space City more seriously than the HMNS. Over the years the museum has continued to exhibit out-of-this-world expositions that honor our intergalactic accomplishments.

With the sensational landing of the Perseverance Rover – endearingly called “Percy” – on Mars, no exhibit in Houston is more apropos than the Houston Museum of Natural Science’s Mars exhibited from now until October 7.

“Our Solar System neighbor has never been closer,” the museum writes on its website. “Usually a small twinkle in the sky, Mars comes to HMNS in another high-resolution sculpture by Luke Jerram, the artist behind guest-favorites Moon by Luke Jerram and Gaia — Earth by Luke Jerram. This sculpture features 120 dpi detailed NASA imagery compiled from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter data – Visible Earth series, NASA.”

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“Distinctive features, like craters, canyons and Rover landing sites, are displayed in stunning resolution on this unique installation. At a 23 feet in diameter and an approximate scale of 1:1 million, each centimeter of the internally lit spherical sculpture represents ten kilometers of Mars’ surface.”

Tickets to Mars are included in the regular admission price of $25 for adults and $16 for children.

If you need a little more space, you can also visit the museum’s Planetarium. With ethereal projections of Pink Floyd’s The Dark Side of the MoonTom Hanks-narrated Passport to the Universeand mystifying phenomena of Black Holes

See also: Earth’s First Commercial Spaceport Coming To Houston